Courses

COURSES, TITLES & INSTRUCTORS

 

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

STATUS

UNITS

INSTRUCTOR & QUALIFICATIONS

DEPARTMENT

 

AFS 810

Introduction to African & Diaspora Studies

 

 

C

2

1. Prof. Muyiwa Falaiye

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)

 

2. Dr. Obi Iwuagwu

(Senior Lecturer)

B.A.(IMSU), M.A., Ph.D.

(Lagos)

 

3. Dr. Sonja Stanley-Niaah

Philosophy

 

 

History and Strategic Studies

 

 

 

ICS, Mona

 

AFS 811

Pan Africanism and the African Diaspora

C

2

1. Prof. Jim I. Unah

B.A., M.A., MPhil., Ph.D.

(Lagos)

 

2. Dr. David Aworawo

(Associate Professor)

B.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)

Philosophy

 

 

 

History and Strategic Studies

 

AFS 812 (a)

 

 

 

 

AFS 812 (b)

The African Experience

 

Or

 

The Rule of Law and Governance in Africa and African Diaspora

 

C

2

1. Prof. A. Adeleke

B.A.(Lagos), M.A.

    (Maiduguri), Ph.D.

(Toronto)

 

2. Dr. O.M. Osiki (Lecturer

1), B.A., M.A. (Lagos),

M.Sc. (Benin), Ph.D.

(Nanjing, China)

 

3. Professor John Bewaji

History and Strategic Studies

 

 

 

History and Strategic Studies

 

 

 

LL.&Philosophy

 

AFS 814

Race, Science and Medicine

C

2

1. Prof. A.A. Osinubi

    MB, BS (Ibadan), M.Sc.,

    Ph.D. (Lagos)

 

2. Dr. P.A. Arikawe

   (Lecturer I)

    B.Sc. (Lagos), M.Sc.

    (Benin), MB, BS (Lagos),

    Ph.D. (Benin)

College of Medicine

 

 

College of Medicine

 

 

AFS 817

Basic Yoruba Language

E

2

1. Prof. O. J. Ajiboye

    B.A., M.A., PGDE.

    (Ilorin), Ph.D. (U.B.C.)

 

2. Dr. L.A. Yusuff

(Associate Professor)

    B.A. (Lagos), M.A.

    (Ibadan), PGDE, Ph.D.

    (Lagos)

Linguistics, African and Asian Studies

 

Linguistics, African and Asian Studies

 

 

AFS 818

Basic Igbo Language

E

2

1. Dr. C.B. Nnabuihe  

(Associate Professor)

    B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)

2. Dr. O.G. Nwagbo

(Lecturer II)

    B.A. (Lagos), M.A., Ph.D.

    (Ibadan)

Linguistics, African and Asian Studies

Linguistics, African and Asian Studies

 

 

AFS 830

Nation Building and its Problems in West and Central Africa

         C

       2

1. Dr. J.G.N. Onyekpe

(Associate Professor); B.A.

(Ibadan); Ph.D. (Lagos)

2. Dr. A. Okeregbe

B.A., M.A. (Ibadan); PhD. (Lagos)

 

History and Strategic Studies

 

Philosophy

 

 

AFS 831

Women and Gender in African Society

E

2

1. Dr. Irene Osemeka

    B.A., M.A., PhD. (Lagos)

2. Dr. E.O. Kehinde

    B.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

    (Lagos)

History and Strategic Studies

 

Philosophy

 

 

 

Number of Units = 16

Compulsory (C) Units = 8

Elective (E) Units = 8

* A minimum of 12 Units of Courses must be registered every Semester.

 

SECOND SEMESTER (1ST YEAR)

 

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

STATUS

UNITS

INSTRUCTOR & QUALIFICATIONS

DEPARTMENT

AFS 820 (a)

 

 

 

AFS 820 (b)

Problems and Issues of Black / African Identity

Or

Debates in Caribbean Cultural Identity

E

2

1. Prof. Muyiwa Falaiye

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)

2. Dr. M. Gbadebo

(Lecturer I), B.A.,

M.A, Ph.D.(Lagos)

Philosophy

 

 

Philosophy

AFS 821

Slavery and Reparation

E

2

1. Prof. A. Olukoju

     B.A.(UNN) M.A.,

   Ph.D. (Ibadan)

 

2. Dr. P. Osimiri

(Lecturer I)

    B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

   (Ibadan)

History and Strategic Studies

 

 

Philosophy

AFS 822

African Traditional Medicine Practices and Indigenous Herbal Knowledge and Practices

E

2

1. Dr. O.C. Orimoogunje

(Associate Professor)

    B.A. (Ife), M.A.

    (Lagos), Ph.D.

    (Ibadan)

Linguistics, African and Asian Studies

 

 

AFS 823 (a)

 

 

 

 

AFS 823 (b)

 

 

 

AFS 823 (c)

 

 

African/Afro-American Literature

 

Or

Modern African Literature

 

Or

Caribbean Linguistics and Poetics

E

2

1. Prof. K.A. King-

   Aribisala; B.A.

    (West Indies), M.A.

    (Leeds), Ph.D. (Sussex)

 

2. Prof. H. Eghagha

    B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

    (Lagos)

English

 

 

 

 

English

AFS 824

Science and Technology in Africa

E

2

1. Dr. L.A. Ogunkanmi  

(Associate Professor)

    B.Sc. (Ed.) (Ife),

    M.Sc., Ph.D. (Lagos)

 

2. Dr. K.O. Adekoya

(Associate Professor)

    B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.

    (Lagos)

 

3. Professor J. Bewaji

Department of Cell Biology and Genetics

 

 

Department of Cell Biology and Genetics

Philosophy

 

LL & Philosophy

AFS 825 (a)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AFS 825 (b)

Economic and Political Philosophy in Contemporary Africa and the Diaspora

 

Or

 

Globalization and Global Governance – Epistemicide, Traditionalism, Nationalism and Dependency

 

C

2

1. Dr. Obi Iwuagwu

(Senior Lecturer)

    B.A. (IMSU), M.A.,

    Ph.D. (Lagos)

 

2. Dr. G.S.M. Okeke

(Senior Lecturer)

    B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.

    (Lagos)

 

3. Professor J. Bewaji

History and Strategic Studies

 

 

 

Political Science

 

 

 

 

LL & Philosophy

AFS 826

Anthropology and African Studies

C

2

1. Dr. A.O. Agugua

(Lecturer I)

    B.Sc. (UNN), M.Sc.,

    Ph.D. (Lagos)

2. Dr. P.E. Adejo

(Lecturer I)

    B.Sc. (Jos), M.Sc.

    (Lagos), Ph.D

    (Ibadan)

Sociology

 

 

 

Sociology

 

AFS 827 (a)

 

 

 

 

AFS 827 (b)

African Films and Theatre

 

Or

 

African Narrative, Film and Text

E

2

1. Prof. Duro Oni

    B.F.A., M.F.A.

    (CalArts), Dip.

    Drama, Ph.D. (Ibadan)

 

2. Prof, O. Ezenwanebe

    B.A. (Ed.) (UNN),

    M.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)

Creative Arts

 

 

 

 

Creative Arts

AFS 828 (a)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AFS 828 (b)

 

 

 

AFS 828 (c)

The Philosophy of African Religions – Comparative of the Triple Heritage

 

Or

 

African Religious Influences in the Caribbean I

Or

African Religious Influences in the Caribbean II

C

2

1. Dr. P.U. Ofuafo

(Senior Lecturer)

    B.A. (Calabar), M.A.

    (Ibadan), Ph.D.

 

 

 

2. Dr. O.P. Otiko

(Lecturer II)

    B.A, M.Ed., Ph.D.

    (Lagos)

 

3. Professor J. Bewaji

Creative Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education

 

 

 

 

LL & Philosophy

Number of Units = 18

Compulsory (C) Units = 6

Elective (E) Units = 12

*A minimum of 12 Units of Courses must be registered every Semester.

 

 

 

 

 

FIRST SEMESTER (2ND YEAR)

 

S/N

COURSE CODE

STATUS

UNITS

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTORS

AFS 813

Ideas of Decolonization

E

2

1. Prof. R.T. Akinyele

    B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)

 

2. Dr. P.I. Oni

   (Senior Lecturer)

    B.A. (Niamey), M.A.

    (Abidjan), Ph.D. (Lagos)

History and Strategic Studies

 

Philosophy

AFS 815

Research Methods in African & Diaspora Studies

C

2

1. Prof. A. O. Adeboye

    B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

    (Ibadan)

 

2. Dr. Paul Osifodurin

   (Senior Lecturer)

    B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)

 

3. Dr. Clinton Hutton

History and Strategic Studies

 

 

History and Strategic Studies

 

 

Government

AFS 816 (a)

 

 

 

 

AFS 816 (b)

Basic Issues in African Philosophy

Or

 

Advanced African Diaspora Philosophy

C

2

1. Prof. G. E. Azenabor

    B.A., M.A., MPhil.,

Ph.D. (Lagos)

2. Dr. A. K. Fayemi

   (Lecturer 1)

    B.A., M.A, Ph.D. (Ago

    -Iwoye)

3. Dr. L. Bamikole

Philosophy

 

 

Philosophy

 

 

 

LL&Philosophy

AFS 832

African Culture and Human Sexuality

C

2

Prof. John Bewaji

LL & Philosophy

AFS 833

 

Key Theories and Debates in Gender and Development

E

 

 

2

 

Prof. John Bewaji

LL & Philosophy

AFS 834

Sexualities, Bodies and Power in Society

E

2

Prof. John Bewaji

LL & Philosophy

AFS 835

Seminar: Ethics, Research Standards, Copy Rights, Intellectual Properties and Language

C

2

All Lecturers

 

AFS 850

Project

C

4

All Lecturers

 

 

Number of Units = 18

Compulsory (C) Units = 10

Elective (E) Units = 8

*A minimum of 12 Units of Courses must be registered every Semester.

 

SUMMARY

Total Number of Courses Available: 22

Total Number of Compulsory Units: 24

Total Number of Elective Units: 28

Total Number of Units: 52

Total Units Required for Graduation: 32

COURSE DESCRIPTION

AFS 810: Introduction to African Studies & Diaspora Studies (C)                            2 units

The course will open with a clear demarcation of the province of African Studies. Key issues and contestations, such as origin, meaning, scope and methodology of African Studies will be discussed. The course will also provide the opportunity to discover the rich and fascinating tapestry of diverse peoples, societies and cultures of Africa. The question of African identity occasioned by slavery, colonialism and racialism will also be discussed. An important theme of the course will be the diversity of Africa with 55 recognized states and perhaps 2000 languages (about one third) of all languages spoken by humans today. Finally, the course will focus on the basic ontological assumptions behind African realities and beliefs systems, including religious beliefs.

 

AFS 811: Pan Africanism and African Diaspora (C)                                 2 units

This course will expound upon Pan-Africanism as a political and cultural movement as well as an ideology, tracing its development from the late 19th century thought of Harlem Renaissance and other thinkers such as Langston Hughes, W.E.B. Dubois, Malcolm Little, Martin Luther King, Walter Rodney, Frantz Fanon, to the 21st century. In addition to the concept of Pan-Africanism, the course explores related themes such as Black Nationalism and Négritude, while situating key figures of the African Diaspora within intellectual genealogy of Pan- African thought. Lectures will be supplemented with documentary films and other multimedia sources.

 

AFS 812 (a): The African Experience (C)                                                       2 units    

This course is an introduction to contemporary Africa and its modern history, cultural diversity, politics, arts and literature, its role in globalization and its relationship with international communities. Africa is a very large and diverse continent; hence the course will function as an overview and springboard for interested students to learn more about particular peoples, cultures, subjects and issues. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge of the contemporary African experience, as well as experience in thinking critically about current issues

and the place of Africa in the global community.

 

OR

 

AFS 812 (b): The Rule of Law and Governance in Africa and African Diaspora (C) 2 units

This is a course in African and African Diaspora Philosophy of Law with specific sensitivity to the foundations of African and Diaspora societies as communitarian spaces for cooperative existence, with legal traditions conducing to this fundamental metaphysic. It recognizes and discusses the triple heritage elucidated by Mazrui, albeit within the context of religious traditions in Africa: European/Christian Legal Traditions, Islamic Legal Traditions and African Indigenous Legal Traditions, leading to legal parallel epistemologies and parallel legal outcomes which are never properly synthesized. Careful attention is paid to the foundations of the rule of law, justice, punishment, evidential traditions, and concepts of right and wrong in the three legal traditions, with a view to understanding the inchoate jurisprudential terrain in Africa and the African Diaspora in contemporary times.

 

AFS 813: Ideas of Decolonization (E)                                              2 units

Clarification of concepts: colonialism, decolonization, neo-colonialism, re-colonization. Liberation and decolonization philosophies: F. Fanon’s racial and colonial revolutionary theory; A. Cabral’s cultural theory; Martin Bernal’s revisionist thesis; Léopold Sédar Senghor’s Négritude; Julius Nyerere’s Ujamaa, Kenneth Kaunda’s humanism; and Kwame Nkrumah’s consciencism. Decolonization as postmodern and externalist resistance in the Third world: Walter Rodney and Ali Mazrui in focus. The internalist construction of decolonization and development: Muyiwa Falaiye and George Ayittey in focus. Decolonization of the methodologies of disciplines: Okot p’Bitek and the decolonization of religious studies; Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o on decolonizing language and literature; L. Smith on decolonization of history; Kwasi Wiredu on conceptual decolonization and African philosophy. Euro-American domination of African studies scholarship: need for and recipes of decolonization

AFS 813: Ideas of Decolonization (E)                                                              2 units

Clarification of concepts: colonialism, decolonization, neo-colonialism, re-colonization. Liberation and decolonization philosophies: F. Fanon’s racial and colonial revolutionary theory; A. Cabral’s cultural theory; Martin Bernal’s revisionist thesis; Léopold Sédar Senghor’s Négritude; Julius Nyerere’s Ujamaa, Kenneth Kaunda’s humanism; and Kwame Nkrumah’s consciencism. Decolonization as postmodern and externalist resistance in the Third world: Walter Rodney and Ali Mazrui in focus. The internalist construction of decolonization and development: Muyiwa Falaiye and George Ayittey in focus. Decolonization of the methodologies of disciplines: Okot p’Bitek and the decolonization of religious studies; Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o on decolonizing language and literature; L. Smith on decolonization of history; Kwasi Wiredu on conceptual decolonization and African philosophy. Euro-American domination of African studies scholarship: need for and recipes of decolonization

 

AFS 814: Race, Science and Medicine (C)                                           2 units

This course shall examine the political, economic and ethical intersections of race, science, and medicine from the period of slavery to 21st century DNA sampling.  It shall explore black identity in medicine especially, the ways sub-Saharan African genetic diversity has intensified biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and biomedical research interest in both pre-colonial and postcolonial research on value of the Black body in medical research. Historical forms of racialized exchange and obligations to participate in clinical trials under unequal structures of appropriation shall be discussed. The moral dilemmas of Blacks in the Diaspora in integrating with the healthcare system in the West within the broader context of differences in conceptions of illness and wellbeing shall be explored. Black experiences within the context of contemporary bioethical challenges of inclusion and consent concerning African-descent research recruitment and participation shall also be discussed.

 

AFS 815: Research Methods in African & Diaspora Studies (C)                               2 units  

This course equips students with an interdisciplinary and methodological pluralism in researching the African experiences as well as ethics in African studies research. Also, it explores methods of research in African studies: ethnography, participant observation and interviewing; oral history and archival research; participatory action research; quantitative methods; visual methods; speculative and reconstructive methods. Stages of Research in African studies: formulating research topic; identification of research problems; surveys, sampling and social categories; critique of literatures; data gathering and analysis. Report writing and reference documentation are also taught.

 

AFS 816 (a): Basic Issues in African Philosophy (C)                                         2 units        

The course will critically examine basic issues in African philosophy, such as African worldviews, various theories and definitions of African philosophy, African doctrines or theories of reality and the universe, life force and its cosmic interactions, moralism in ancient African philosophy, African humanism, the question of African identity, various schools of thought in African philosophy as well as problems in African philosophy will be identified and discussed.

 

OR

 

AFS 816 (b): Advanced African Diaspora Philosophy      (C)                   2 units

This course provides the opportunity to explore such issues as: The relevance of Philosophy in African, Themes in African, such as Epistemological Issues, Metaphysical Issues, Axiological Issues. Other Special Themes in African Philosophy: slavery, colonialism, leadership vacuum, educational issues, morality of oppression, dependency syndrome, scapegoat mentality, identity crises, etc., and intellectual figures in African Philosophy such as Sithole, Awolowo, Nkrumah, Nyerere, Cabral, Mandela, Tutu, Wiredu, Oruka, Sodipo, Hountondji, etc. will be explored.

 

 

AFS 817: Basic Yoruba Language (E)                                                               2 units

This beginners Yoruba course introduces students to Yoruba language and to some aspects of Yoruba culture and daily life. Students in this course are not required to have any prior formal knowledge of the language. Level 1 standard Yoruba language is specifically designed to provide beginners with fundamental skills in mastering the language and make students aware of the phonetics and orthography of the language. Yoruba us a tonal language; as such the class will sensitize students to the importance of tonal accents (on vowels) in words, their meaning and contextual usage. To this end, focus of the course will be on words articulation, contextual usage and cultural values while also helping students to develop the fore skill involved in language learning and understanding.

 

AFS 818: Basic Igbo Language (E)                                                         2 units

This course introduces students to the history of Igbo people, their religion and worldview. The course will also take a look at The Igbo grammar, phonetics and phonology. Practical exercises will be done through regular interactions with Igbo communities in order to enhance the proficiency in spoken Igbo.

 

AFS 820 (a): Problems and Issues of Black/African Identity (E)                     2 units

Understanding identities: essentialism and eliminativism. African and Afro-diasporic identities as social constructs: roles of gender, class, race, sexuality, and nationality. The identity question: eurocentricism and the Afrocentric response. The Bell Curve theory and the concept of Blackness. Blackness as resistance: Frantz Fanon, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X. Blackness and consciousness: W.E.B. Du Bois, Paul Gilroy. Identity in the age of globalization, multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism: Kwame Appiah, Will Kymlicka, Charles Taylor. Dilemmas of collective and unique black identity: Ladun Anise, Muyiwa Falaiye. Cultural dislocation, identity question and the future of Africa: Kwasi Wiredu, Olusegun Oladipo.

 

OR

 

AFS 820 (b): Debates in Caribbean Cultural Identity

This course allows students to examine key issues in research on the construction of identity/ies

in the Caribbean. Students will wrestle with the questions of what defines the Caribbean/WestIndies/Antilles and the relationship of the Caribbean Diaspora to these entities. They will alsoexamine the ideological debates surrounding identity formation with special reference to theissues pertaining to the colonial and the post-colonial context. The relationship between identity,race, culture, gender, sexuality and ethnicity in the Caribbean will also be explored.Consequently, such concepts as creolisation, interculturation, creole identities, hybridity,essentialism, national and diasporic identities will be assessed.

 

AFS 821: Slavery and Reparations (E)                                                             2 units          

This multidisciplinary course examines historical, philosophical, political, psychological and economic issues connected to the theme of slavery and reparations. Specifically, an attempt would be made to provide an abridged history of trans-Atlantic trade which would cover its origin, evolution and the eventual termination as well as examine the legitimizing narratives and theories invented to justify the practice slavery and colonization. Also, the course will critically examine the purported impact of slavery on the economy, culture and the politics and even the psychology of black Africans in order for students to reach their own conclusions. Finally, the course will zero in on the debates surrounding the question of reparations to determine whether there are any moral or legal bases for the claim that colonial powers by virtue of their involvement in trans-Atlantic slave trade and colonial occupation are obligated to providing some form of compensation to their ex-colonies.

 

AFS 822: African Traditional Medicine Practices and Indigenous Herbal Knowledge and                      Practices (E)                                          2 units

The course is structured in three parts: African concept of medicine, treatment and practices in Africa, limitations and challenges. African concept of traditional medicine will examine the nature and principles of traditional African medicine. Treatment and practices will examine various diseases, in relation to age, social class, the history of the patient, the causes and classifications of diseases; the therapies such as biological, natural, physical and spiritual therapies will be investigated. A special focus will be given to psychiatric disorders and treatments. The third part will focus on limitations and challenges of African traditional medicine and practices with a view to studying the fundamental issues of choice of therapy, choice of health provider within the community, cost of health care in traditional African society and beliefs on traditional medicine in contemporary Africa.

 

AFS 823: African/Afro American Literature (E)                                                          2 units

The course acquaints students with critical and various aspects of oral and written literature in Africa. It gives students an overview of Africa and its History. The course explores the three periods of African literature, the correlation between Indigenous African literature and contemporary literature theories with a look at themes like Renaissance, Identity, Revolution, etc. It examines the African Francophone, Anglophone and Lusophone literatures as well as the Afro American literature from the beginning to the contemporary times. Literary Icons such as Tony Morrison, Langston Hughes, Olaudah Equiano, Amos Tutuola, Léopold Sédar Senghor, David Diop, Wole Soyinka, Aimé Césaire, Léon Gontran Damas, Frantz Fanon etc. will be studied.  

 

AFS 824: Science and Technology in Africa (E)                                     2 units

There is a consensus within academic and policy making circles that Africa needs to emphasize science and deploy appropriate technology if it must solve the problems of poverty, hunger and disease which have become the predicament of majority of Africans. There are, however, a volley of questions concerning science and technology on the continent: What was the level of development of science and technology before the advent of Western civilization? Were there cultural or historical factors responsible for the stunted nature of technological advancement in Africa? What is the potential role of education and culture and philosophy in promoting the scientific attitude? What would a robust policy for the acquisition and the rapid development of technology look like? The course seeks to provide answers to these questions. Beyond this, it will explore the scientific and technological contributions of traditional African civilization and individual African inventors to the world. It also examines the myriads of obstacles to the growth of science and technology with a view to providing insights for transcending these obstacles. In addition, it will explore the impact of science and technology on African culture and the environment with the intent of finding ways to mitigate the potential negative consequences of technology.

 

AFS 825 (a): Economic and Political Philosophy in Contemporary Africa and the Diaspora                          (C)                                                                                          2 units

This course provides a comprehensive study on contemporary African politics. Various contemporary issues motivated the course among which the nature of African states, African states and economic growth, African states and internal politics, governing ideologies, forms of ethnic and political pluralism, correlation between political and economic power, power and challenges, chronic underdevelopment, citizenship in African states, cultural, religious, ethnic linkages and politics, dynamic of violence, impacts of western intervention in Africa etc.

 

OR

 

AFS 825 (b): Globalization and Global Governance – Epistemicide, Traditionalism,                                    Nationalism and Dependency (C)                                            2 units

Governance is at the centre of the debate on globalisation. Can global governance achieve democratic and effective institutional outcomes? This question arises with greater urgency as the course unfolds. The course begins with a retrospective gaze at the Bretton Woods Institutional underpinnings of the global political economy; i.e. the UN, the IMF, World Bank and GATT/WTO and how the concept of governance rose to prominence. It then proceeds through a set of debates and case studies to critically assess the role of these and other international institutions in resolving transnational problems. Context is provided by attention being paid to the spectre of power in international relations.

 

AFS 826: Anthropology and African Studies (C)                                           2 units  

This course is an advanced study of the anthropological approaches to African societies and culture. The focus will be on an advanced knowledge of anthropology with emphasis on social and cultural anthropology. The images and constructs of Africans and African cultures by   Lucien Lévy-Bruhl, Robin Horton and others shall the discussed. The colonial agenda of anthropological studies shall be examined vis-a-vis the need for and pathways to decolonizing African studies. Other topics to be examined include: pre-colonial history of Africa and Africa Diaspora, historiography and anthropology of gender. The course shall explore the question of African anthropological theory and the contributions of Anthropology to the understanding of Africa. Also to be discussed are issues on the interconnections of Africa with the Caribbean and the Arab world, taking into context studies on the historical and economic transformation of African societies through such relations.

 

AFS 827: African Films and Theatre (E)                                       2 units        

This course shall be an advanced discussion on the nature, origins and functions of films and theatre in African society.  The forms of films such as documentary, comedy, action and black film aesthetics shall be discussed. The trends in and genres of African theatre such as theatre for development, children’s theatre, theatre of the oppressed, among others shall be explored. Particular focus shall be on the social, entertainment, and economic pathos of African music, dance, ritual and comedies in traditional and contemporary times.

 

AFS 828 (a): The Philosophy of African Religions – Comparative of the Triple Heritage                    (C                                                               2 units

This course is a descriptive analysis and multi-disciplinary, secular study of religious beliefs, behaviours, and institutions of the African people. It describes compares, interprets and explains African religions, emphasizing systematic, historically-based, and cross-cultural perspectives. Amongst other things, it also discusses how supernatural forces (such as deities) are said to influence behaviours and beliefs; and how this is interpreted in the community and in other forms of social relations.

 

OR

AFS 828 (b): African Religious Influences in the Caribbean I                 C                     2 units

This course will investigate the African influenced religious expressions in the Caribbean. It will examine the nature of African Traditional Religions, paying particular attention to its historical emergence within the region and to the characteristics that are now in evidence. The underlying focus will be theological. In the second of two courses, the focus will be on Caribbean religious reality that emerged from Africa and African Culture in religion.

 

AFS 831 Women and Gender in African Society (E)        2 units

This course is intended to interrogate key themes and debates in the study of gender and women in Africa. Students will be expected to acquire a solid grounding in the main theoretical/conceptual issues of gender studies in Africa and the Diaspora and explore the production of knowledge about African women both on the continent and in the Diaspora. The course also provides in-depth discussion of the interaction of some of the major themes in African gender history, including issues of kinship, family and marriage, migration, work, access to resources and control of labour; women’s spirituality, women’s assertion of their rights in a variety of settings and their collective actions and activism from both a temporal and spatial perspective.

 

AFS 832: African Culture and Human Sexuality  (E)                   2 units

This course draws on theories at the juncture of gender and cultural studies, to question the production and consumption of Jamaican popular music culture and critically examine the intersections of gender and sexuality therein. It explores the ways in which Jamaican popular music has been instrumental in mediating constructions, both national and personal, and how the creation, consumption, and understanding of culture are dependent on our often-unconscious assumptions regarding gender and sexuality. Thus, the course also signals how unequal power structures and stereotypical and oppressive role models can be revealed and challenged. In this regard, it will be seen how culture shapes our perception of who we are (or who we are supposed to be) and how we behave (or how we are expected to behave). The course will focus on dancehall music as contemporary popular Jamaican music, but will also draw from other genres, including reggae and mento.

 

 

AFS 833: Key Theories and Debates in Gender and Development (E)   2 units

This course is designed to expose students to development paradigms, theories and issues from a gendered perspective. A gender based analysis of development issues such as governance, education, labour market and health care is done with the aim of ascertaining the ways in which they are being (or can be) transformed to entities that exhibit and promote gender equality, social justice and sustainable development. The course also critically assesses the major social institutions as they exist in the Caribbean from a gender perspective to assess the extent to which these institutions currently reinforce or reproduce inequalities within the wider society/region. The course also explores and suggests strategies for action and social change.

 

AFS 834:     Sexualities, Bodies and Power in Society (E)             2 units

This Course addresses the important area of sexualities and bodies which is an important area in feminist scholarship and gender studies. It highlights the continuous tension between bodies as natural and biological but also socially and culturally constructed concepts. The complexities of gender identity and its relationship with fixed bodies is addressed as well as the debates and discourses around acceptable and transgressive sexualities. The policy implications attendant on these issues will also be addressed.

 

AFS 835: Seminar: Ethics, Research Standards, Copy Rights, Intellectual Properties, and                      Language       (C)                                                                             2 units

The aim of this course is to provide support and structure to students in the first phases of their project writing. It is designed to introduce students to the intellectual and professional rigour of project writing   with guidance about conducting research. After submitting their proposals titles, students are expected to consult with their lecturers, seek their guidance in order to refine and revise the proposal as well as discuss the next phases of seminar paper writing. The seminar is a compulsory course for all M.A. students.    

 

AFS 850: Project (C)                                                                                     4 units              

This is a project of between 15,000 – 20,000 words, based on wide research with the assistance of a supervisor. The research should be an evidence of independent enquiry and grounding in any chosen topical issues in African studies. Students will develop their research proposals and submit a finished research project that would be presented to a panel of the African Studies Board, which assesses its score.